• Texture And Pattern Photography - Tips, Tricks & How To Get Out Of A Photo Slump

Textures & Patterns

Texture photography is all about finding and shooting patterns, details, color and depth. Sometimes in the most boring places! Textures are everywhere. They can be discovered around, in and on everything.
  • Walls
  • Sidewalks
  • Water
  • Glass
  • Rusty Metal
  • Buildings
  • Fluids
  • Beautiful
  • Ugly

Because there is an unlimited number of photos right outside your door, "texture hunting” can be addictive!

Many photographers use this style of photography to break themselves out of a block or slump. Find a broken windshield, shoot it! Find an interesting textured wall, shoot it! Stick your camera under in old rusty boat, and shoot it!

Camera Settings: Aperture

Experiment by opening & closing your aperture

Opening and closing your aperture settings in texture photography is an area where you can experiment and change the look/feel of an image quite a bit.
An image at f/2.8 will look MUCH different than the same frame taken at f/16.

If you're going for an image that is in focus across most of the frame, close your aperture up (f/13, f/16 or more). If you are looking for more of a shallow depth of field, try opening (f3.5, f5.6).

You'll be surprised by the different looks you can get.

Camera Settings: ISO

Give yourself flexibility during editing by shooting at a low ISO

Most digital cameras are capable of ISO 200, 100 or lower. This will get you a great dynamic range, less noise/grain, and best color depth. One of the reasons why so many artists enjoy texture photography is that there are many artistic options when it comes time to edit the photo.

You can dramatically affect images in post-production by adjusting curves, brightness, color balance, contrast and MORE!

Low ISO will help you transform your image (if you want to).

Camera Settings: Shutter Speed

You may need a tripod when using slower shutter speeds...

To make up for shooting at a low ISO, you can slow your shutter speed down. This means that camera shake, and motion blur could hinder your image.

Try using a tripod! This will help stabilize your photograph and get you the results you're looking for.

Article By John McLenaghan

ThemeSong Media - Orlando, FL





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